Growing Up Is Not Easy

All children and adolescents face problems from time to time. They may:

  • Feel afraid to go to school
  • Have difficulty organizing their time efficiently
  • Lack effective study skills
  • Fall behind in their school work
  • Lack self-discipline
  • Worry about family matters such as divorce and death
  • Feel depressed or anxious
  • Experiment with drugs and alcohol
  • Think about suicide
  • Worry about their sexuality
  • Face difficult situations, such as applying to college, getting a job, or quitting school
  • Question their aptitudes and abilities

School psychologists help children, parents, teachers, and members of the community understand and resolve these concerns. The following situations demonstrate how school psychologists may typically approach problems.

Family Problems

The teacher noticed that Carla, an able student, had stopped participating in class discussions and had difficulty paying attention. The school psychologist was asked to explore why Carla’s behavior had changed so much. After discovering that Carla’s parents were divorcing, the school psychologist provided counseling for Carla and gave her parents suggestions for this difficult time. Carla’s behavior and self-esteem improved, and she felt more secure about her relationship with her parents. School psychologists can be trusted to help with delicate personal and family situations that interfere with schooling.

Reading Problems

Tommy’s parents were concerned about his difficulty in reading. They feared that he would fall behind and lose confidence in himself. In school the teacher noticed that Tommy understood what was presented in verbal form, but that he needed the help of his classmates to do written work. After observing Tommy and gathering information about his reading and writing skills, the school psychologist collaborated with his parents and teachers to develop a plan to improve his reading and writing. The plan worked, and both Tommy’s reading and his self-esteem improved. School psychologists can help prevent future problems when they intervene with learning problems early on.

A Potential Dropout

David was a high school student who often skipped class. He had very poor behavior and had been suspended from school on various occasions for fighting. After establishing a relationship with David, the school psychologist taught him simple techniques to relax and to control his aggressive behavior. David’s mother and his teacher worked together on a plan designed by the school psychologist to establish limits and to improve communication. School psychologists recognize that changes in the school environment and at home can improve the quality of life for children and their families.

Resource

Back to School Transitions: Tips for Parents

The National Association of School Psychologists:

Suite 402, 4340 East West Highway,
Bethesda, MD 20814;
(301) 657-0270;

www.nasponline.org

NASP represents and supports school psychology through leadership to enhance the mental health and educational competence of all children.

This handout was developed by Arlene Silva, University of Maryland school psychology graduate student intern at the NASP office (summer 2003), with contributions from NASP staff and leadership.

Helpful Links

American Psychological Association
National Association of School Psychologists
Pennsylvania Department of Education